Advocating Peace and Global Art Education: Two Quilts, One World

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As the world grows smaller and communication ever faster, it is of increasing importance that global understanding accompanies globalization. This Peace Quilt project initiated in New York and carried to Uttar Pradesh, India symbolizes the practical effort towards understanding, communication and empathy in a way that no business arrangement ever could. New York Director of Art Education Dr. Rikki Asher, assisted by secondary education art teacher Jane Pinchuck set up an exchange of skills between the groups. This illustrated account shows how girls on either side of the world rose to the challenge of creating works of art that would communicate their lives to each other. The presentation includes a description of the US/India Peace Quilt exchange with a Bronx school. The purpose is to offer possibilities for educators to explore relationships between art, language, and communication through the theme of "Peace" and to advocate art education locally and globally.


Keywords: Global, Art Education, Art for Peace, Gender Equity
Stream: Creative Arts and Learning
Presentation Type: 30 minute Paper Presentation in English
Paper: , , Advocating Peace and Global Art Education


Dr. Rikki Asher

Director of Art Educaiton, CUNY Queens College, City Universtiy of New York
Flushing, NY, USA

Rikki Asher: Painter, muralist, and art educator with 20 years as an educator of Fine Arts both primary and secondary levels as well as college and museum education; with a deep and abiding commitment to making art accessible to a diverse range of communities, in the US and internationally. She has written and lectured about interdisciplinary and multi-cultural art methodologies. She has taught art in the South Bronx, Harlem, India, England, Nicaragua, and Mexico. In her role as artist and teacher she introduces new ways of seeing one’s surroundings by developing art experiences that foster fresh possibilities of the environment through art. Her recent research of an art exchange with rural girls in India and the South Bronx illustrates how the girls rose to the challenge of creating works of art that communicate the essence of their lives to each other. Formally a Teaching Artist at MOMA and The Lincoln Center Institute and assistant professor at SUNY New Paltz. Currently, Director of Art Education at CUNY Queens College. Received an Ed.D. from Columbia University and an MFA from CUNY Lehman College. Director of the London Art Seminar. Preparing a Study Abroad Program in India for January 2009.

Ref: L09P0140